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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 297 (some duplicates have been removed)
a referendum on membership to the european union. the prime minister said the vote would come after renegotiation of the links to the european union. critics are saying that membership is not a pick and miss option. >> we would give the british people a very simple in or out choice. to stay in the union on these new terms or to come out altogether. >> if you do not know this is really already, you will in the future. his surprise showing in the election could make him a key player in coalition talks. flash floods in the andes, supply is contaminated. also in the program, aaron is here with the latest business news. looks like a shy and is coming off of apple? >> we are looking at a shift in the technology world. apple shares bit more than 30% in the last few months. the new iphone is stumbling. the question is this, are the best days of apple behind them? >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem, 12 noon in london, where david cameron has said it is time to give the british people a choice about membership in the european union. the prime minister pledged to hold a s
at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined work over generations and a commitment to friendship and the resolve never to revisit that dark past. a commitment epitomized by the treaty found 50 years ago this week. after the berlin wall came down, i visited that city and i will never forget it. the abandoned checkpoints in the sense of excitement about the future. the knowledge that a great continent
on britain's future and the european union is his conservative party selected about in the next turn. he outlined a framework for new relationship with europe which included more flexibility, democratic accountability and giving power back to member states. this is 45 minutes. >> good morning and i'd like to thank bloomberg very much for hosting me this morning. this morning i want to talk about the future of europe. but first, let us remember the past. 70 years ago, europe was being torn apart by its second catastrophic conflict in a generation. a war which saw the streets of european cities strewn with rubble. the skies of london led by flames night after night. and millions dead across the world in the battle for piece and liberty. as we remember their sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe from war to sustained piece in about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined to work over generations. a commitment to friendship and i resolve never to revisit that dark past, a commitment epitomized by the police a treaty signed 50
will be campaigning to stay in? >> yes, i want britain to be part of a reformed and successful european union. this argument, this entire argument is about what is in the national interest of britain. [shouting] we want a european union that is more open, more flexible, more competitive, not just good for britain but good for europe, to. >> i don't think that was quite a complete answer to my question, mr. speaker. let's see if we can press them a bit further about how he is going to vote. is he saying, is he saying that if he doesn't achieve his negotiating strategy he will recommend a part-time cancer -- the part-time chancellor can't hang on for a minute. is he saying if he doesn't achieve his negotiation strategy he will recommend britain lead the european union? >> first of all is very welcome, it's accepting the premise the conservatives will win the next election. [cheers and applause] >> and interestingly, an interest in not raising the fact the unemployment figures are down once again today. employment is up why 90,000 this quarter, and the rate of job growth last year was the fastes
of a reformed and successful european union. this entire argument is about what is in britain's national interests. we want a european union that is more open, more flexible, more competitive, not just good for britain, but good for europe too. >> i do not think that was quite a complete answer to my question. let us see if we can press the prime minister a bit further about how he is going to vote. is he saying that if he does not achieve his negotiating strategy, he will recommend-a part-time chancellor can hang on a minute. is he saying that if he does not achieve his negotiating strategy, he will recommend that britain leads the european union? >> it is are welcome that the right honorable gentleman is accepting the promise -- a promise that conservatives will win. interestingly, not reason the fact that the unemployment figures are down once again today. employment is up by 90,000 this quarter, and the rate of job growth last year was the fastest since 1989. i answered his question very clearly. i want to see a strong britain in a reformed europe. we have a clear plan. we want to re
to leave the european union? >> and the bundesliga swings back into action after a six- week winter lay off. >> stay with us. >> welcome back. the financial crisis has also had a fallout in british politics. the prime minister has delayed what must be the hotly -- the most hotly awaited speech of his career. >> cameron was due to travel to the netherlands to speak about recasting britain sometimes difficult relationship with the european union but instead spent the day in london dealing with events unfolding in algeria, but experts of his speech have been released. he will say that more of the same in the eu is not enough. he is also expected to demand a renegotiation of britain's membership with the block and then put the new terms to a public referendum. critics say he is pandering to euro skeptics in his own conservative party. for more on britain's relationship with the eu, we spoke to the president of the european parliament and asked first why he was so opposed to prime minister cameron's efforts to reclaim some of the powers london has ceded to brussels. >> i think we would need a st
the public decide if they want to stay in the european union if he's reelected. david cameron ended months of speculation by promising a referendum on the question, it he is backing. 2015. however, he said that he prefers britain to stay in member of the you. -- in the -- state a member of the eu. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i want a better deal for britain. but not just for britain, but for europe, too. i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. i want completing the single market to be are driving mission. i want us to be at the forefront and also the transformative trade deals with the u.s., japan and india as part of the drive toward global free trade. and i want us to be pushing to prevent europe's smallest entrepreneurial companies from more eu directives. these should be the task that it european officials up in the morning and keep them working late into the night. >> lawrence lee has more pure >> historic sites -- has more. >> histo
america." should they stay, or should they go? choosing whether they want to belong to the european union. the pakistan's supreme court is holding an inquiry into the death of an official who was investigating corruption allegations against the prime minister. after being found dead last week. a report. >> the funeral of the investigator who was probing corruption allegations against the prime minister of pakistan. almost one week on, the key question remains unanswered. did he take his own life, or was he murdered? the 31-year-old official was found hanging last friday, three days after the supreme court ordered the prime minister to admit he was under pressure. police say it looks like suicide, but they are not ruling out foul play. outside the court today, his brother-in-law said in his body was proof of murder. >> we some marks on the left and right shoulder, he said. there was a cut on the forearm, and there were marks on his back. it seems he was trying to flee. we believe he was killed. >> the family is looking to the supreme court for answers and for justice. the government has al
>> right now, the european union is in distress. what would a failed euro mean for the e.u. or for its largest trading partner, the u.s.? >> the '08/'09 financial panic/crash/great recession put tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has
. speaker, in advance of his speech, investors need to know what britain did the european union in five years time? >> on important decisions can a first of all congratulate him on an important decision that he faced this week, that is to keep the shadow chancellor in place? [shouting] >> rarely, rarely do we see such cross party support. my view is that britain is better off in the european union, but i think it is right for us -- [shouting] it is right for us to see the changes taking place in europe and to make sure that we are arguing on the changes that britain needs. so that, therefore, we have a better relationship with when britain and your. we have a better organize the european union and we have a full hearted consent of the european union people. those are the choices we're making. what are his choice of? >> maybe we are making a better progress, mr. speaker. in october 2011, i'm sure the prime minister will remember this, he and i walked shoulder to shoulder through the lobby. against the 81 members of his party who voted for and and out referendum. you might call it to part
what britain did the european union in five years time? >> on important decisions can a first of all congratulate him on an important decision that he faced this week, that is to keep the shadow chancellor in place? [shouting] >> rarely, rarely do we see such cross party support. my view is that britain is better off in the european union, but i think it is right for us -- [shouting] it is right for us to see the changes taking place in europe and to make sure that we are arguing on the changes that britain needs. so that, therefore, we have a better relationship with when britain and your. we have a better organize the european union and we have a full hearted consent of the european union people. those are the choices we're making. what are his choice of? >> maybe we are making a better progress, mr. speaker. in october 2011, i'm sure the prime minister will remember this, he and i walked shoulder to shoulder through the lobby. against the 81 members of his party who voted for and and out referendum. you might call it to parties working together in the national interest. now, the f
out in the open on the website, and so u.n., european union, american bar association, dean said most law schools at american universities, all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government. this form of transnational government. so let's look at for people, just some quick views of players who have given a taste of the concept global governance. strobe talbott is currently the president of the brookings institution, a major think tank in washington. former secretary of state as a journalist for "time" magazine in the 1990s, talbott wrote an article in which he welcomes supernatural political authority. he said, how back in the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete in all states will recognize a single global authority. he concluded by saying that his devolution of power, upwards towards supranational and downwards toward units of administration is basically a positive phenomenon. harold koh is currently the legal adviser at the u.s. state department. in other words, he advises the president on what international law is. he was dean of the
inviting the lord into the consequences of the united kingdom to leave the european union? >> i always, i always listen closely to what he says, and i'm a huge fan of his plans for an induction strategy. on issue of europe haven't always agreed. he was a leading proponent of britain joining the single currency and i've always been opposed to the. on issue of the referendum i gently remind my right honorable friend he was in that referendum was very much part of his manifesto of the last election. [shouting] >> in the interest of harmony i think we'll leave that to one side. >> mr. speaker, a constituent of mine with a chronic medical condition tells me that he is just 20 pounds a week to spend on food and clothing after paying his utility bills, and after april after the welfare cuts in april, he will just have to pounds a day. if the prime minister police we're all in it together, with the agreed to review the impact on the very poorest of the welfare cuts so that my constituents sacrifices are in line with his own? >> i will look very close to what the honorable gentleman says
had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with all my heart and all my soul because i believe something very deeply -- that britain's national interest is best served in a flexible, adaptable, and open european union. >> camera position is focused on more effective -- cameron's vision is focused on more effective and market position. >> the terrible thing is the glaring contradiction the speech is based on. he says he wants more trade with in the single markets, but he also wants fewer regulations. but 80% of the u.'s regulations are connected with the single market. it shows he does not understand the facts. >> we do not want just a trading bloc. we need a common political vision. >> everything must be decided in brussels and by brussels -- not all and everything must be dec
at rebuilding the country. since 2010, the european union has been the most important donor when it comes to aid given to haiti. your country continues to have to cope with the disastrous consequences of the earthquake and this year, once again, natural disasters once again struck your country. hurricane isaac and heard gain sandy left destruction in their wake with devastating consequences on supply and the population with food, etc.. you can always count on close cooperation and support from the eu. we want to help your country we want to help your country become economically and politically stable, a country which can provide for itself, and which can make a contribution itself to reducing poverty. we have hopes for establishing a lasting democracy and stability in haiti. there are huge challenges you have to face, president martelly, and we are aware of the dramatic challenges that you face three years after the catastrophe struck 370,000 people in your country in need of decent housing because they have to live in very difficult conditions. this is of the utmost significance. the reconstruc
, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes to the u.s. and britain's relationship to it -- in his address to world leaders in davos. >> i'm not just proposing change for britain. i'm proposing change for europe. we are falling behind in th
, -- the european union is now making a big effort in certain areas and in terms of development and cooperation. year, proud of its outreach, of its convictions, of the thinking which it has given the world. it's responsive to the world problems. there is what it has embarked on side by side with countries. people must know that the countries -- it cannot close its borders. it cannot turn off the tap of its generosity in its brain power. that is what can be put into a world, one which is more morally economic, one which is safer in environmental times, more democratic. haiti, strengthened and fortified by this friendship, which is seeking to throw off the status quo and cliches, which is to break the chains of underdevelopment and to exorcise its demons. my administration has been at it along the way, but no one can deny our good faith. this year, in haiti, once again, we have been affected to differing degrees of the tropical tempests of isaac and sandy. once again, the cost has been counted in human lives, in harvests, it in people's houses, and in livestock, which have all suffered, and once
." >> merkel -- merkel is praising athens' austerity drive and says the entire european union faces difficulty in the months ahead to overcome differences. >> a wet and blustery berlin awaited the greek prime minister. he was in the german capital awaiting a conference organized by the newspaper, but he also dropped in on chancellor merkel for what were described as informal talks. samaras said greece was still doing all it could to get its economic house in order. >> in greece, we are making enormous effort and great sacrifices to get things back on the right track. we are doing everything we can to regain our credibility -- credibility with the other european nations and with the markets. >> the german chancellor believes the only way for greece to get its credibility back is far-reaching reforms. that has made her the target of many anti-austerity demonstrations in greece. there was no mention of that in berlin -- just a reminder from merkel that germany's pockets are not bottomless. >> we, too, must do everything we can to make sure our economy grows so that people's jobs are safe. >> both
are overfished. another sad truth is europe is failing to take adequate action. yes, the european union is trying to replenish endangered fish stocks by setting limits on how much each eu state can catch of what kind of fish, but there's fierce debate over those quotas every year, and there are some types of fish that are not covered by fishing regulations at all -- scallops, for example. the eu says that since shellfish do not migrate, it is up to countries like britain and france to decide for themselves what is sustainable, but now it seems a scallop war is brewing in the english channel of mid resentment over who fishes what and where. >> this coastal town in southwest england has been provided for by fishing. out at sea, the crew of this trawler had a confrontation with french fisherman staking a claim to the scallop beds. captain smith was quite shaken by the experience. >> especially monday morning, 8:00, it all kicked off. i was woken up to be told we were surrounded by french trawlers. it was definitely a premeditated attack. >> the french fisherman film the altercation -- the french fis
and bautista efforts to seal a free-trade agreement between the european union and the community of latin america and caribbean states. >> many hoped the summit will go beyond issues of trade. it is a chance for latin america and caribbean to work together. host country chile also says developing closer ties to the european union would benefit both sides. >> europe's higher level of development can be a huge boon to latin america, and latin america can help european countries and companies. >> there's pressure on europeans to ensure that deals are socially and ecologically responsible. >> i know this is a very important summit, particularly because there are big issues around sustainable development, economic growth. >> the latin american and caribbean countries came to present a road map for future cooperation. many are pushing for agreement but will also provide protection for indigenous peoples and environmental safeguards and help produce income inequality in the region. >> latin america wants more balance to relations, and it wants to be part of the solution of the problem. in santia
one. but i do believe that the european union will always be much more than an international organization, but at the same time, less than a state. i do think that the next step in european integration is strengthening the euro, in other words, having more economic policy coordination, but we'll never have a fully below economic -- >> you say you support what david cameron was saying. so what would you say, though, if britain says, look, we joined what we thought was a common market. we don't want to be told -- have rulings handed down by the european court all the time and all the red tape for business. if they don't get a repeal for that stuff, where would you stand? >> first of all, i think the whole idea that the european union is only a common market is a fallacy. it's simply wrong. the european union is a political union which uses economic instruments. what i like about cameron is the economic instruments which he suggests. it's less red tape, more single markets, more competitiveness. that's the side that we need to work on and i think that's going to be the idealogic
's moderating panels at the world economic forum, where there's been talk about the future of the european union. we spoke earlier this evening. >> ray, let's start with the news this week. the u.k. is making some noises about backing away in some parts from the european union. what is the reaction there? where are all these european leaders are. >> well, here in davous the week was heavily dominated by news of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know,
. but that has helped us as we had too high air pollution in brussels as it was sanctioned by the european union that we really could stress on alternative mobility. we don't wait until european legislation or regulation coming up. we also have no brussels, no belgium, but european towns, towns in europe, trying to find one another and to press, to put pressure on mayors and regional ministers to commit themselves to invest in bicycle policies. so those towns can learn from one another. as i told you, brussels, i have found several similarities with the two towns i have been getting to know now yesterday and today. we have about one million inhabitants. brussels is 10 to 10 miles on distance and i agree with what has been told here that that is in favor of promoting cycling because the distances are never too long, although we also have a difference of height. i mean, like amsterdam is plat as a pancake we would say. brussels does have some, well, ups and downs. an important issue politically is that we have -- we are, in fact, giving big gross national product to the country, 20%, although we'r
-skeptic as the majority of czechs. >> i'm afraid of many. the european union is doing now. his opinions are a bit more extreme. >> many people seem to be taking his licks in stride or even liking them. as before voting began, their orders to beating up campaign newspapers in the cafes. >> i'm not sure if this is the right guy for a presidency, but he is an interesting one. >> while he attracts all the media attention, there's little interest in the front runners, like the conservative former prime minister who also once headed the office of statistics. we asked the foreign minister if they oppose the establishment. >> i think they are fed up with politicians. >> it is that sentiment that has gotten him this far in the campaign. commentators have called him a potential king-maker. he is not a politician. his latest opera recently premiered and it is a science fiction work in which amphibian's take over the world. they are too clever for the human. they will show that they can also be clever about their elected officials. >> former on the presidential race in the czech republic, we are joined by our eas
survived eight previous assassination attempts. the irish government has called on the european union to ease terms on its multi-billion euro bailout loan. the irish prime minister has told eu officials that solving his country's debt crisis is his top priority. >> the eu commission president was in dublin on thursday for a meeting to coincide with ireland taking over the rotating presidency. he also praised the irish government's efforts to bring its debt down. >> the irish prime minister and his deputy are looking ahead to six months at the helm of europe. it is a chance to tout ireland as proof that the u.'s reforms for the debt crisis can work. >> economic growth was stronger than expected at the end of last year. the deficit is lower than predicted. >> the irish government itself is confident. it aims to use its experience to help the e you find a way out of the current crisis. >> obviously, the president and his team are very conscious of ireland's own recovery story. we will work very diligently and energetically in terms of our agenda. >> ireland's first task will be to forge
have dropped and the number of poor is grown. the european union said nearly a quarter of the population is at risk of poverty or social exclusion. that means they can't afford to pay their bills or heat their homes. what is known as severe material deprivation. or it could mean the income falls below a nationally set threshold, which is called a relative poverty. nowhere member states like bulgaria and romania, that is where almost half the population has been affected. struggling eurozone members greece and spain are also dealing with their own rising levels of poverty, for up to the quarter and a third of all people. even in germany, the economic powerhouse, about one out of five people fall into at least one of the you poverty categories tariff a report from the capital, berlin. >> poverty is a relative thing. in germany, it needs skimping on visits to the doctor and not being able to pay for heat in winter or for fresh food. that is why these people wait their turn in this church, where handouts of fruit and vegetables help them at least stay healthy in the cold we
with the european union. david carolwood speaking at the world economic forum -- david cameron was speaking at the world economic forum in switzerland. >> britain has a choice purdue and hope it stands back and the argument -- britain has a choice. they can stand back or say yes, the european union needs to change to suit the euro but also to suit all of us as well. make the argument for a flexible, competitive euro, take the british people with you. >> south africa is looking at newark power for its future nuclear ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear energy needs. >> the corzine were the original inhabitants of southern africa. for at least 2000 years, the hunted, herded, and gathered on the land and the sea. skeletons in the sand and evidence of what and where they ate. >> maybe they ate the food out of the jars. >> the land was seized by colonialists. under apartheid, their identity was further fracturing the proposal to build a nuclear power station here is unacceptable. >> they take our land. they are ready to take our identity away from us. everything we have got, they
on the european union. he said that europe must reform and must bring back its internal market and the free market to the core of what it does and he will put membership in the european union up to referendum after the next election, europe needs democratic legitimacy and he needs to be reconfirmed by the voters. it's a smar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 297 (some duplicates have been removed)

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